Photographic archive of the Sacred Convent of St. Francis in Assisi is live with MomaPIX.

Sacred Convent of St. Francis in Assisi represents one of the best places in Italy for culture. Its photographic archive contains artistic masterpieces of the Assis’s Basilica such as frescos of Giotto, Lorenzetti and Simone Martini, in addition to the most important historical
documents for St. Francis’ history and to the medieval and Renaissance manuscripts. A historical heritage which includes also the negatives on collodio and silver bromide plate of the nineteenth-century Carloforti’s Fund.

About two years ago we received a contact request by Fra Carlo Bottero, Photographic archive of the Sacred Convent of St. Francis in Assisi‘s Director.
The Sacred Convent began an accurate cataloguing and restoration work for the archive and was searching for a solution that allowed to manage on top and give value to that hidden treasure.
We were enthusiastic to be a key player in this fascinating mission. Whenever we deal with museum or historical photo archive, it’s a question of maintaining the culture alive.

Specifically, Sacro Convent needed a solution to archive images and give to researchers, art passionates or simply curios people to search online photos and also buy them, both digital files and Fine Art photo printings.

After some weeks of work, the website www.fotosacroconvento.it was live, structured in four sections: Archive and Library, Art in the Shrine, Historical photos
and News.
It is possible to search images for categories, sub categories, keywords and dates.

Many tools to easily share the archive contents are available. Among these, there is the possibility to send private links by email to show a fullscreen slideshow of images. It is also possible to send e-news to the registered users to promote the archive contents and
check if the emails have been red or not.

“MomaPIX team led us to a bespoke solution. – says Fra Carlo Bottero – We are happy for the result achieved, we gave visibility to part of the Sacred Convent photographic heritage and we will go ahead in this important work.”